3 Training Myths That Trainers Believe In

I just recently delivered a high energy session on how you can deliver high impact training to your audience. SIA has brought all their trainers all around the world to equip them with the skills to be better trainers and facilitators and I’m grateful to be one of the two external speakers to conduct this session.

Here are some common myths that I crushed during my session:

1. “It is difficult to create high energy in such huge crowds.”

Whether I train a group of 7 people or 330 people, there are principles that I will adhere to create better engagement with the audience. Chunking the training programs into 20-30min segments create better engagement. Instead of me talking all the time, I allowed them to process their thoughts through writing, partner discussions and group shares. All these enhance perspectives and group learning. Look at the photo above, I got over 200 people to do things in a crowded ballroom. It was kinesthetic and participants loved it. Energy is sometimes created by creating movement. When there is motion, there’s emotions.

2. “Content is important and we need to ensure that we deliver great content.”

This is true but not always the case. Content is important because people want to learn things that are useful and work. But audiences also want a good experience, high energy and fun. Audiences nowadays are sophisticated and want ‘edutainment’, a mix between education and entertainment. They want content but they want a great learning experience as well. We all know that a great trainer will always bring out great content but great content may not always bring out a great trainer.

3. “I’m not naturally energetic, so I’ll be who I am in front of my audience.”

It is a firm belief in my company that everyone who trains or facilitates from the front must have incredibly high energy. Great trainers manage their energy levels and are professionals when they get into the stage. They extrude incredible energy and entice their participants to respond as well. Consider an actor in front of an audience, they are always in the character that they are playing. Regardless of how they feel or how tired they are, they are in that element; in that space. Great trainers get on that stage and are at their very best, they are consumed with how they need to demonstrate high energy because the crowd feeds on it.

So, the next time you teach or speak to large groups of people, don’t let these myths prevent you from being awesome. Focus on delivering a great experience.